This week in Places of interest we will look at some interesting attractions in the north-eastern part of Södermalm in Stockholm. This area is known by the locals because of Slussen and Stadsgården which are places visited by thousands every day. Last week, I brought you stories of five staircases in this area which have an exciting history. In this post, I will navigate you to these stairways and, moreover, point you to other places in the area that are worth seeing.

Söderbergs Staircase (Söderbergs trappor) is with its 144 stairs the longest staircase in Stockholm. The current staircase replaced the original wooden one that was built to facilitate the transport of raw materials and finished textile products to and from the port in Stadsgården. It received its name after Johan Söderberg who was a member of the family with a long tradition in the knitting industry.
Show on Map

Mayors’ Staircase (Borgmästartrappan) was completed in 1911 when it, just like the first staircase on our list, replaced and older wooden staircase. The name of this place was chosen because originally the staircase formed a border of the house of the mayor Olof Hansson Törne. Today, the staircase connects Katarinavägen with Stadsgården.
Show on Map

Katarina Kyrkobacke is a spectacular historical street which is in part formed by two separate staircases. At the northern end of this narrow street, you will find the more modern of the two stairways which is made of stone. The other one, which leads from Klevgränd to Katarinavägen, is older and therefore it is made of wooden stairs.
Show on Map

Klevgränd 1c. At the western side of Klevgränd, you can find a house which is probably the oldest one on Södermalm. According to the wall anchors used on the house, which can easily be seen on its façade, it was built in the early 17th century, perhaps a little earlier. The houses attached to the one on Klevgränd 1c are not as old, but also very nice so check them out, too.
Show on Map

Katarina Elevator (Katarinahissen) connected Slussen and Katarinavägen already in 1883. Originally, it was powered by a steam engine and it cost 5 öre to go up and 3 öre to use the elevator in the opposite direction. The elevator has been reconstructed several times. Its current construction dates back to 1936 but unfortunately it has been out of use since 2010.
Show on Map

Statue of Thor Modéen. Thor Odert Folke Modéen was a Swedish actor and comedian who collaborated with the Södra Teatern between the 1920s and the 1940s. Today, you can see his statue just outside the theatre. The staircase leading from Katarinavägen to the theatre was dedicated to the artist on the day of the 100th anniversary of his birth and carries his name to this day.
Show on Map

I hope you will enjoy exploring these few unusual attractions in Stockholm’s Södermalm. But, by no means, stop there. There are plenty of other places to see in the area so be sure to admire all the beauties that Södermalm has to offer. If you like, you can also find more places in the White Mountains, the area on the same island which I covered here on Trevl previously.

Stay tuned for more posts that are coming this week. Already on Wednesday, I will tell you what happened after the Danish King Christian II successfully invaded Sweden almost five hundred years ago. Until then, check out Trevl on Instagram where you will find new photos daily. To never miss a new post, sign up for our newsletter.